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summerandjoe
09-15-2009, 04:27 PM
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/09/ ... 1&mbid=yhp (http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/09/the-150-space-camera-mit-students-beat-nasa-on-beer-money-budget?npu=1&mbid=yhp)

TunedAlready02
09-15-2009, 04:32 PM
i was just reading that... seems like if they can do that for $300 then there are far greater things that can be done by the average person than we realize

VF34RX
09-15-2009, 04:32 PM
Wow that is extremely badass. I would love to do something like that.

summerandjoe
09-15-2009, 04:46 PM
i was just reading that... seems like if they can do that for $300 then there are far greater things that can be done by the average person than we realize


less than $150. the plan on selling the plans for $150. so, $150 for the plans + $150 for the materials = $300. i'm sure we can all figure out how to do it without the need of the plans.

Crispy
09-15-2009, 05:01 PM
What happens when someone's space camera lands on a car, and the camera has a few pics of the person launching it and driving away while the cam was going up?

Awesome idea though, this would be great fun to do

Just4fuN
09-16-2009, 03:03 AM
less than $150. the plan on selling the plans for $150. so, $150 for the plans + $150 for the materials = $300. i'm sure we can all figure out how to do it without the need of the plans.

There's an update at the end of the article saying the instructions will be free.

scooby_rex
09-16-2009, 08:47 AM
freaking amazing!

the $150 would have just covered their cost LOL

DanC
09-16-2009, 12:07 PM
That sounds like fun. :)

I started reading all the comments and it didn't take very long for Betty Buzzkill to waltz in:


What exactly would happen, legally speaking, if one of these contraptions falls on someone or their property? Shouldn’t there be some sort of basic-safety protections necessary to prevent this as much as possible? These people basically got lucky they didn’t kill anyone.


Thankfully, she was followed by a more sane responder:



Posted by: PeterBrady | 09/15/09 | 11:01 am
I was thinking the same as redsauce, sounds somewhat dangerous given that you can only calculate a general area where you think it might land. I’d also be pretty pissed off if a beer cooler fell from the heavens into my yard only to discover it was not, in fact, full of beer.


Unfortunately, Nelly Nitpicker also decided to drop by:



Posted by: furioshonen | 09/15/09 | 2:25 pm
I hate to be a stickler, but the headline is false. Though its 18 miles is really cool and I don’t want to take away from what an awesome achievement this is, over blowing this by saying “space” is wrong, and not great journalism. Technically 93,000 feet, or about 28.34 kilometers, is still in the Troposphere, definitely not space. Our atmosphere has 5 different parts, the Troposphere, Mesosphere, Thermosphere, Stratosphere, and Excosphere. Now you could argue that the Stratosphere could at least colloquially be refereed to as space, because that is where the space shuttle and space station are in geosynchronous orbits. Really good weather balloons can potentially travel as high as 50,000 km or (31 miles) high. Also, some domestic flights can go as high as 20,000 miles, and might be able to get a one way ticket on Jet Blue around the same price. So, although this is cool, because they did it hobby stuff…. its not “space” cool. I know this drives hits to your site, but sometimes it doesn’t bode well for wired journalism, as in the past I have held you to a higher standard than this, I mean at least this is not the New York Times, or Fox News. But, lets not let Wired slip that far. So lets be clear, the MIT guys didn’t “beat” NASA, they barely beat airplanes, and it isn’t Space. So use quotation marks if you want to post colloquial terms that draw non technical viewers.


Why start a post with "I hate to rain on your parade" when the rest of the post reveals that you in fact love doing exactly that?

Zero1
09-16-2009, 12:50 PM
Unfortunately, Nelly Nitpicker also decided to drop by:



Posted by: furioshonen | 09/15/09 | 2:25 pm
I hate to be a stickler, but the headline is false. Though its 18 miles is really cool and I don’t want to take away from what an awesome achievement this is, over blowing this by saying “space” is wrong, and not great journalism. Technically 93,000 feet, or about 28.34 kilometers, is still in the Troposphere, definitely not space. Our atmosphere has 5 different parts, the Troposphere, Mesosphere, Thermosphere, Stratosphere, and Excosphere. Now you could argue that the Stratosphere could at least colloquially be refereed to as space, because that is where the space shuttle and space station are in geosynchronous orbits. Really good weather balloons can potentially travel as high as 50,000 km or (31 miles) high. Also, some domestic flights can go as high as 20,000 miles, and might be able to get a one way ticket on Jet Blue around the same price. So, although this is cool, because they did it hobby stuff…. its not “space” cool. I know this drives hits to your site, but sometimes it doesn’t bode well for wired journalism, as in the past I have held you to a higher standard than this, I mean at least this is not the New York Times, or Fox News. But, lets not let Wired slip that far. So lets be clear, the MIT guys didn’t “beat” NASA, they barely beat airplanes, and it isn’t Space. So use quotation marks if you want to post colloquial terms that draw non technical viewers.


Why start a post with "I hate to rain on your parade" when the rest of the post reveals that you in fact love doing exactly that?


What a tool, things that are 20,000 miles from the earth are kinda far out there (about a twelfth the distance to the moon) ;)

Not to mention that commercial airliners fly between 15k and 40k ft normally. I suppose that for every smart person there has to be a dumb person who thinks they're smart...

Yoda says, "Strong the force is not with this one"

WRXNFX
09-17-2009, 11:05 PM
Kewl project.