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scooby_rex
08-07-2009, 10:55 PM
so I got a DSLR (Nikon D40) a week or so ago and have been doing the customary "try to wear out the camera in the first week" stuff. Since we seem to have enough peeps on here into photography, here are a couple pics that I like that I took. Any criticism is welcome :)

.. and yes, I work at night so thats why I seem to have a dark theme LOL

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics04.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics03.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics02.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics01.jpg

TunedAlready02
08-07-2009, 11:43 PM
looks good, no complaints from me. i always jump on an opportunity to post pics so here are the ones from the first time i tried night shots and didnt know what the hell i was doing, yours probably turned out better though i had better vantage points

http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/duluth/DSC_0088-1.jpg
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/duluth/DSC_0090-1.jpg
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/duluth/DSC_0114-1.jpg
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/duluth/DSC_0116-1.jpg
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/duluth/DSC_0191.jpg
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/duluth/DSC_0200.jpg

matt25sti
08-08-2009, 08:54 AM
Dammit you guys are going to make me get a camera :x

Peaty
08-09-2009, 08:05 AM
Cool, since you work at night get yourself a tripod and get some shots using Bulb. Hold the shutter open as cars go by and stuff like that. I always like long exposure stuff :)

I got a access to a new camera last week also a Nikon a D3x, haven't' done much with it yet though.

DevXTech
08-09-2009, 11:07 AM
I love the photos. I need to get my Cannon Rebel XS out and tinker with it sometime. I think it'd be cool to have a photo shoot cruise. Basically cruise around to different spots around KC and shoot night shots or day shots. Also those of us new to the photography world could maybe pick up some tips and tricks from those of you who are more experienced. 8)

TunedAlready02
08-09-2009, 11:43 AM
I got a access to a new camera last week also a Nikon a D3x, haven't' done much with it yet though.

post up some pics if you have some. i was thinking of getting the d700, which has the same sensor as the d3, im not sure what they changed with the x. i wanted the mark ii but after doing a bunch of reading it looks like the d700 is a little better for what i want to do, plus i have nikon now.

WRXNFX
08-09-2009, 04:35 PM
Peaty has lot's of pics.

google got me these.

http://www.digitalfotographer.com/index ... at=63;u=14 (http://www.digitalfotographer.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=0aa11cc9716fafa1e85e0c5af6cd44 74&action=gallery;su=user;cat=63;u=14)

i lost my short cut to your suby stuff..

Peaty did you have a fire?

scooby_rex
08-09-2009, 07:50 PM
the photo-cruise could be pretty cool, although good lighting would run out quickly except for night shots

btw, I do have a tripod :)

... if the neighborhood I worked in was a little safer, I would take more street level shots, up on the roof I'm safe LOL

Lunger
08-09-2009, 08:15 PM
Awesome pics Scooby!

DanC
08-09-2009, 09:16 PM
If you're in the market for a camera spend some time here (http://www.kenrockwell.com/). It has reviews of Nikon and Canon gear and a few how-to guides.

Here is part of his page on the D700



The D700 has image quality indistinguishable from the klunky old D3, both in terms of sharpness and at high ISOs. The D700 has the same superb 3" LCD, but handles even better than the old D3 better due to a new INFO button and smarter firmware. I own a D3, and I prefer the D700 except that the D700 lacks the 5:4 crop mode I often use (most people don't care).

Even at $8,000, the overpriced D3X isn't an improvement over the D3. Sorry rich people. The D3X is the same as the D3, except that it only has the same frame rate as the D700 (maybe even a little slower), and the D3X lacks the high ISO performance of either the D3 or D700.

Unless you're a full-time sports, news or action pro, the D700 replaces the D3 for studio, wedding, portrait, nature and landscape pros, as well as all advanced amateur photographers.

paper_tiger
08-10-2009, 05:46 AM
I will be back from Colorado tonight and have a ton of pics from the event. My Outback earned it's stripes as it crested Pike's Peak and took plenty photos of the event.

Nice pics but quick tip, as I mentioned before in the Airport thread, watch those horizontals lines. It is real hard to do when handholding the camera unless you have a rule of thirds grid in your view finder. My Rebel does not have this feature and I often have to go in photoshop and do a quick correction. You could also get a tripod with a bubble level but I often find them cumbersom and don't like to lug them around, Gorilla Pod FTW here.

Also it is usually a better picture if the horizon is not directly dead center, 50/50, of the shot. For example look at our new logo at the top of the screen, the horizon line is made up of the long flat top of Bartle Hall and it is roughly at the 1/3 mark on the photo and falls into one of the "Rule of Thirds" lines. Leaving the other 2/3rds for the sky and taller buildings. It might have been cropped so it can be long and narrow for the top but as a result it makes a more compelling picture.

Not trying to be a photo snob here and don't spend all of your time obsessing over these itesm but with time you will do it automatically in the viewfinder before you snap the shot. Seriously go pick up Bryan Peterson's books, you will gain so much "insight" to the world of photography it is nuts.

Sneak peak,
http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/5521/img0280p.jpg

* I am on a Mac and have no idea what I am doing so I had to use crappy web tools to shrink this down and post. So if the image is off or a bit blurry this is why. Real version once I get back to my PC and CS4.*

TunedAlready02
08-10-2009, 08:26 AM
here are the ones from the first time i tried night shots and didnt know what the hell i was doing

paper_tiger
08-10-2009, 06:54 PM
here are the ones from the first time i tried night shots and didnt know what the hell i was doing

By no means am I knocking the shots, I quite like them. Josh asked for "criticism" and I offered some basic pointers that would be discussed in any entry level photography class. It is one of those things you tend to not notice until it is brought to your attention and them BAM you look back at your album and say "crap, look at all of those that are off!" Easy fix to make excellent shots, plus it will save you time from having to go back with photoshop and spend a bunch of time correcting your pictures.

Josh,
Look forward to more photos from you and your Nikon. You should attempt what Peaty was talking about and set the shutter to a low speed and use a tripod for some of your night shots. You can get some real cool effects with the moving traffic.

TunedAlready02
08-10-2009, 07:46 PM
my bad tiger i was in a bad mood and took it the wrong way. thanks for the pointers, all mine are 50/50 and it would probably look better if it werent

paper_tiger
08-10-2009, 09:14 PM
No worries, sometimes my pointers come off as condescending and/or know-it-all. By no means am I a pro photographer, I just have lots of photo theory crammed up in my head.

By offsetting the "horizon" line to either 1/3rd or 2/3rds of the frame you are breaking up the indecision of the image and adding a weight to the subject. If you are doing a landscape shot, you want the land to fill the majority and the reverse is true if doing a sky shots. Granted none of this is ever set in stone and free to be modified as needed.

The areas I know I still need to work on are my use of lighting, best times are either at dawn or at dusk, and the position of the lighting as well as filling the frame with my subject. Often times I get too many distractions in the area around my point of focus.

I will get off my soap box here but am glad to offer tips whenever asked.

scooby_rex
08-10-2009, 11:33 PM
alright seth, now you've got me more curious about your 1/3rds comment. Looking aback at the second and fourth pic and I can easily see where the composure was off, where those the pic/pics were you referring to? I thought the first one was split into thirds pretty well with the horizon being on the bottom third and the tall building running right up the righthand third. In the third shot the buildings take the up the bottom 2/3rds and the staircase is on the righthand third, too. The reason I ask is because I was thinking about thirds in those pics for sure and was trying to compose them for that. I was using a tripod on the third shot for sure (and I think the first one as well, but it needed to be raised to clear that railing), and even used the timer trick :)

anyways, I do appreciate the comments, so this is going to become the photo-noob thread :D

paper_tiger
08-11-2009, 12:23 AM
Josh, your shots are lined up on the third lines quite well, my comments about using the rule of thirds is aimed mostly towards Aaron's shots. I did not notice the split between where your photos ended and his began (still getting used to the new layout and our Avatars being on the right) which is why it was a blanket comment. He picked up on what I was talking about so all is good there.

Often times I forget to change my ISO until I have fired off a few rounds, resulting in unnecessary noise in my shots. Usually it is not too bad since I rarely go over 400 but I prefer to keep it at 100. With it at 100 I really need to use my monopod or tripod a lot more than I really do.

In regards to lighting I rarely get the chance to shoot at dusk or dawn so to help simulate the warm lighting that you get from late afternoon sun I keep the white balance on cloudy (cloudy +2 if you have the option) at all times. The proper gradient filter should help make the colors pop a bit more with this setting.

paper_tiger
08-11-2009, 12:37 AM
Here are the few I like out of the 180 I took from Colorado:

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/Colorado/IMG_0242.jpg

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/Colorado/IMG_0281.jpg

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/Colorado/IMG_0283.jpg

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/Colorado/IMG_0307.jpg

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/Colorado/IMG_0322.jpg

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/Colorado/IMG_0420.jpg

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/Colorado/IMG_0438.jpg

Like all other people here I am more than welcome to receive any and all input. I need to get my camera cleaned, dust from the peak got into my camera and a good number of shots have been ruined and can be saved with some CS4 work but I am a bit lazy. Often times when shooting something vast, I like to stick a person into the shot somewhere to create a sense of scale since the human form is the most recognized form.

cubedweller
08-11-2009, 12:56 AM
Josh, great photos. Dig the rack.

xPoltergeistx
08-11-2009, 02:44 AM
A few things to remember:

Aperture: The bigger the number, the smaller the hole. The smaller the hole, the less amount of background focus you get. If you want the entire frame in focus, keep your aperture open more. (that's the easiest way to keep things in focus, IMO)

Night-shots: Always use your self-timer and experiment. It may take a couple more pictures and a tripod to get what you want, but in the end it will turn out much better than settling with a standard "full-auto" picture

Day-shots: Don't take them in the middle of the day with no clouds and the sun shining at high-noon, It's a little bit harder to get a decent picture without over-exposure, than taking them a bit later in the day

On Cameras: You don't need a $5k camera to take a great picture. lenses make a huge difference. Unfortunately, sometimes lenses cost more than the actual camera! Go to a local camera shop, and if you get bored with the lense(s) you're using now, checking out some different ones for different effects. Fish-eye and super-wide angle lenses are my favorites.

On Photoshop: Unfortunately, a lot of great pictures taken today are post-processed through photoshop. If you don't have photoshop, you can download with a crack through various torrent sites. And if you do have photoshop, but dont know very many of the little tricks this wonderful program contains search through the internet! lots of the tips and tricks sites are very informative and have great directions anyone could follow :)

On YOUR camera: Experiment with all the color settings to get what you like! sometimes cameras have a brightness and contrast/ hue and saturation control for different kinds of pictures. Check out your manual to see what it says about them

EDIT:
Sorry, I almost forgot... If you are able to, DEFINITELY get a copy of Adobe Lightroom. It's one of the best investments I've made for photography. The price tag for this software is pretty steep @ $300 but if you can torrent this, then for sure do it.

I don't really have many credentials, but these have all helped me! Plus it helps I'm going to school for photography haha
But here are a couple of my favorite pictures I've taken lateley! The Tiger was at the Omaha Zoo, and the Chevelle is a friend of a friend's. I used a vintage post-processing trick to give it a dif. feel
[attachment=1:318lruq7]OmahaZooTiger1.jpg[/attachment:318lruq7][attachment=0:318lruq7]VintageStyleSS.jpg[/attachment:318lruq7]

paper_tiger
08-11-2009, 08:19 AM
On Photoshop: Unfortunately, a lot of great pictures taken today are post-processed through photoshop. If you don't have photoshop, you can download with a crack through various torrent sites. And if you do have photoshop, but dont know very many of the little tricks this wonderful program contains search through the internet! lots of the tips and tricks sites are very informative and have great directions anyone could follow :)

Anymore too many people rely on PS to create a good picture instead of just taking a good picture. That is not to say that it is handy, like fixing minor dust spots, color balance as needed, removing a rogue item in the background, or straightening up your horizontal or vertical lines. It is also fun to screw around on the shot with different effects and filters but don't rely on it to do the job, that is what the camera is for. It should only be an axillary tool in the tool box, not the toolbox itself.

Anymore with PS's ease of use too many people, classes, and photo books will spend a great deal of their time teaching you how to build good images on the computer. When this starts to happen I often wonder what is the point of even taking the picture? Also HDR photography is a fad that needs to die.

BTW if you can't get PS you can always use GIMP with the Raw plugin. It is free and works about as well.

Everything else by Poltergeist is spot on. Adjusting your Aperture is one of the easiest things to get some great effects. A low aperture (f/4.0 or so) will focus your shot primarily on what is directly in front of you and wash out everything else. A high aperture (f/22 or up) will take nice broad shots with everything in focus even if it does not look that way in the view finder. This number is great for city or landscape shots.
A middle number (f/8.0 or so) is useful when you really don't care about the depth of field and just want your point of interest in the shot.

For wildlife shots rule of thirds gets tossed a bit out the window here. Simple rule of thumb, when shooting wildlife aim for the eyes or you missed the shot. Easy as that but you also want to include space for them to look off to in the frame.

Final bit on me rambling, as Poltergeist said put your money into lenses and filters not into the body. An expensive body has some extra features to help you out but it will not make up for a lack of skill. I will say, it is (and in my case would be) quite handy to have a wide selection of lenses at your disposal but having only one will force you to be far more creative when it comes to capturing that image.

*1k post :D *

TunedAlready02
08-11-2009, 10:15 AM
http://s647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/

Do you have a DeviantArt account?

paper_tiger
08-11-2009, 10:55 AM
http://s647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/

Do you have a DeviantArt account?

Nope, should I? I have heard the name but have never checked it out.

TunedAlready02
08-11-2009, 12:05 PM
[quote="paper_tiger":2uttp99u]http://s647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/papertiger80/

Do you have a DeviantArt account?

Nope, should I? I have heard the name but have never checked it out.[/quote:2uttp99u]

its a fun site for people to show their work as well as check out work from others, im on there quite a bit to get ideas for stuff. click my name in my sig for a link to mine. it doesnt take long to upload stuff and its free for a basic account.

TunedAlready02
08-12-2009, 12:15 AM
went down to boone hospital tonight to see my sisters new baby, of course i took the camera... i got a star filter a few months ago when i was in dallas, thought i would finally try it out. picture is kinda shibby as i shot thru glass with no tripod on a 25 second exposure. turned out kinda neat, need more time to experiment with it tho.

http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/DSC_0034.jpg

scooby_rex
08-12-2009, 02:25 AM
impressive for no tripod! I like it

Peaty
08-12-2009, 08:15 AM
Aperture: The bigger the number, the smaller the hole. The smaller the hole, the less amount of background focus you get. If you want the entire frame in focus, keep your aperture open more. (that's the easiest way to keep things in focus, IMO)

You got that backwards the higher the Aperture number or f/stop the more depth of field (DOF) you will have. Wider open lower f/ stop less DOF. Debth of Field is how much is in focus in front and back of your subject.

Most of my photos are here:

http://www.peatpics.com

scooby_rex
08-12-2009, 09:26 AM
a few more photos

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics05.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics06.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics07.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics08.jpg
*yes Im aware I'm crooked, the alley was slanted so that didnt help :P

paper_tiger
08-12-2009, 09:52 AM
Aperture: The bigger the number, the smaller the hole. The smaller the hole, the less amount of background focus you get. If you want the entire frame in focus, keep your aperture open more. (that's the easiest way to keep things in focus, IMO)

You got that backwards the higher the Aperture number or f/stop the more depth of field (DOF) you will have. Wider open lower f/ stop less DOF. Debth of Field is how much is in focus in front and back of your subject.

Most of my photos are here:

http://www.peatpics.com

Peaty is 100% correct here, smaller the number = bigger the hole = less depth of field.
I like to do a lot of my shooting at f/4 but that is "my style" and I don't have a macro lens so my 70-200 f/4 L is having to pull double duty. I also like the way f/4 locks on to the subject of the photo and fades the rest out into a smooth blur.

Josh, Arron, both awesome. Aside from the tree (which you can't do much about) the first alley shot is fantastic. The orange hue gives it a nice glow.

Peaty, what can you not do!

xPoltergeistx
08-12-2009, 02:54 PM
Aperture: The bigger the number, the smaller the hole. The smaller the hole, the less amount of background focus you get. If you want the entire frame in focus, keep your aperture open more. (that's the easiest way to keep things in focus, IMO)

You got that backwards the higher the Aperture number or f/stop the more depth of field (DOF) you will have. Wider open lower f/ stop less DOF. Debth of Field is how much is in focus in front and back of your subject.

Most of my photos are here:

http://www.peatpics.com

If I have an aperture at F22, the lense hole is going to be smaller than f2.5. Yeah, the higher the number the more DOF you're going to get, which goes with saying, the higher the number, more will be in focus. Or maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're saying? :lol:

TunedAlready02
08-12-2009, 03:22 PM
to clear up any confusion, courtesy of wikipedia

xPoltergeistx
08-12-2009, 03:28 PM
oh, haha, that's what I was getting at, I didn't word myself too well it looks like. sorry about that

paper_tiger
08-12-2009, 03:39 PM
Aperture: The bigger the number, the smaller the hole. The smaller the hole, the less amount of background focus you get. If you want the entire frame in focus, keep your aperture open more. (that's the easiest way to keep things in focus, IMO)

You got that backwards the higher the Aperture number or f/stop the more depth of field (DOF) you will have. Wider open lower f/ stop less DOF. Debth of Field is how much is in focus in front and back of your subject.

Most of my photos are here:

http://www.peatpics.com

If I have an aperture at F22, the lense hole is going to be smaller than f2.5. Yeah, the higher the number the more DOF you're going to get, which goes with saying, the higher the number, more will be in focus. Or maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're saying? :lol:

The part I put in bold is what is incorrect. The larger the aperture opening the smaller the number selected on your camera. So with an f-stop of f/2.8 or f/4 you are going to get a lot more light to the sensor but the depth of field is going to be greatly reduced whereas if you select an f-stop of f/22 or f/32 you will have a tiny little hole letting barely any light into the sensor which results in a greater depth of field.

Large f-stops (f/22 and up) are what is used primarily for landscape shots because everything from foreground to infinity will be in focus through the lens. What you might be thinking of is the following:
To get great landscape shots and to allow the maximum amount of coverage in your lens you would want to combine a high f-stop with a low ISO (100 or lower is you can), a real slow shutter speed, a tripod, and a low MM lens. You are going to get a much "bigger" shot with more in focus if you are using a 14mm 2.8/f L lens set to f/22 versus a 300mm f/2.8 L set to f/2.8
*see Aaron's response as a pictorial summary of my wall of text*

Good god I sound like such a nerd...... :|

summerandjoe
08-12-2009, 03:55 PM
i've been thinking of getting a good camera for a few months. you guys keep talking amongst yourselves and i will learn what i can.

xPoltergeistx
08-12-2009, 04:31 PM
OH! I totally mis-read my own post, thanks for clearing that up!

paper_tiger
08-12-2009, 05:47 PM
Hey no worries, just did not want anyone learning to be confused by transposed numbers. Setting the aperture is easy, it is getting the right ISO, Shutter Speed, and F-stop is where it gets tricky. I still have a long way to go getting this all down.

Another quick note for anyone, don't sweat the histogram charts. You will drive yourself nuts trying to develop a nice curve without any spikes in it. In all honesty most of the time you will not really notice and if you do have blowouts in the whits and what not you can always tweak it in PS.

TunedAlready02
08-17-2009, 01:01 AM
not sure if you all got the light show in the city like we got up here but it wouldnt have been a problem to drive around with no headlights on for about 3 solid hours. this was the first time i tried to shoot lightning, its tricky but here are 12 of the 14 i shot that actually had lightning, the other 120 or so was just bright sky. the power line is kind of annoying but i wasnt about to leave my porch with my camera. most were shot at f/3.5 200 iso on bulb, no post process besides the obvious crop/resize.

http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/lightning.jpg

paper_tiger
08-17-2009, 09:32 AM
Hot dog, Lightning shots are not something I have tried but kudos on them.

Here are some tips on taking excellent lighting shots, please not I did not write this:

"I get asked how to capture lightning shots a lot. Here is a little tutorial:

Recommended Equipment:
1. Camera that will let you use the "bulb" shutter setting and still set the aperture separately.
2. Good heavy tripod
3. Cable release (to remotely trip the shutter and hold it open)
4. Wide angle lens (17mm is what I usually use)
5. Watch with a second hand you can see in the dark.

Technique:

1. Setup your camera/tripod in an area it can’t get wet. Use a lens hood if your lens has one.

2. Set your focus to manual and focus the lens at infinity. Use your markings on the lens as a guide if it is too dark to see through the lens.

3. Set your camera to manual mode for both shutter and aperture (usually the “m” setting on DSLRs).

4. Set the shutter speed to “Bulb”. That is the mode where the shutter stays open for as long as you hold it open. It is imperative that you use a remote cable release for this so you don’t have to touch the camera while holding the shutter open.

5. Set your aperture around midway. If it is dark outside, I find an aperture of 13 works best for me. The goal is to set it so that you can open the shutter long enough (15 - 30 seconds) and get a good sky without it being too dark or too light.

7. Trip the shutter with the cable release and hold it for 15 to 30 seconds. It is best to time it with your watch so you can find the exact time with the best exposure.

8. Pray for a lightning strike while the shutter is open!

9. Close the shutter and view your result. If too dark, hold open longer, if too light shorten the time. You can also adjust the aperture if needed.

10. Repeat. Adjust, Repeat, Adjust, Repeat Adjust…..
A storm with not much lightning, you might have to take 50 to 100 empty shots before you get the lightning. A storm like last night, I was able to capture lightning on every other try—sometimes with two or three different lightning strikes in one exposure.

Tip: If lightning goes off 5 seconds into the exposure, don't be tempted to close the shutter and look at it. Still keep exposing at least for 80- 85% of the time you were targeting.

For instance, if you would normally time for 30 seconds, keep going for at least 25sec. A good lightning burst (or two if you are lucky) will lessen the total exposure time... but not as much as you think."

I would have to say the tripod and shutter release cable are by far the most important part of doing this. Trying to handhold the camera in real low light is rarely going to work in your favor even with a lens that has IS (VR for you Nikon people) and trying to use the self timer to trip the shutter is nothing but a cruel joke for this type of shoot. I had a shutter release cable, it broke, and enjoyed it a lot for late night shots and other such fun projects plus I felt it offers more control of the shoot over using the self timer when going for tack-sharp images.

Peaty
08-17-2009, 01:18 PM
Check this place out:

http://www.digitalfotographer.com/index.php

Pretty good forum, not a ton of traffic but a bunch of nice people that are very helpful. Kind of like this place but for Digital Photography ;)

scooby_rex
08-17-2009, 03:58 PM
Check this place out:

http://www.digitalfotographer.com/index.php

Pretty good forum, not a ton of traffic but a bunch of nice people that are very helpful. Kind of like this place but for Digital Photography ;)


dangit peaty, between you and dan you're both going to get me in trouble! my wife already says I spend too much time on kcsubaru, but times that by like 4 and I'm really in trouble LOL

paper_tiger
08-17-2009, 05:03 PM
Check this place out:

http://www.digitalfotographer.com/index.php

Pretty good forum, not a ton of traffic but a bunch of nice people that are very helpful. Kind of like this place but for Digital Photography ;)

This is an excellent site.

Another great place to live is this:

http://digital-photography-school.com/

I don't visit the forums that often but I read the front page updates regularly whereas my friends live off of the site's forum. That place has a wealth of information and the photo contests are really cleaver.

scooby_rex
08-20-2009, 10:31 AM
a weird art piece at my work

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/Practice%20Pics/practice_pics09.jpg

for some reason I just like the way it's all abstract and photoshopped looking, but there was no post production

DevXTech
08-20-2009, 01:14 PM
This is an excellent site.

Another great place to live is this:

http://digital-photography-school.com/


+1 on DPS. I subscribe to the RSS feed for them. They have great articles and they are easy to understand.

scooby_rex
08-22-2009, 12:07 AM
http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j169/joshdeibert/practice_pics11.jpg

having some fun with the aperture setting on the camera :D

only editing was cropping and resizing

TunedAlready02
08-22-2009, 01:19 AM
you do that with a laser?

scooby_rex
08-22-2009, 04:02 PM
you do that with a laser?

nope, I used an LED flashlight and my finger :)

I would make a letter then cover the flashlight with my finger, then all it took was the glass that the camera and my reflection were on

TunedAlready02
10-03-2009, 12:10 AM
anyone else do any infrared? i bought a filter a while back but hardly ever use it. its hard to get the right conditions to shoot IR with an unmodified camera

my latest:
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/DSC_0010-1.jpg

also im still having an itch for a macro. here is a shot with my kit lens the other day.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/small.jpg

mid life crisis
10-03-2009, 10:44 AM
anyone else do any infrared? i bought a filter a while back but hardly ever use it. its hard to get the right conditions to shoot IR with an unmodified camera

my latest:
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/DSC_0010-1.jpg

also im still having an itch for a macro. here is a shot with my kit lens the other day.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s313/ahill2005/small.jpg


Love the infrared tractor. That's awesome.

Miracle max
10-03-2011, 03:43 PM
Im bringing this thread back from the dead.

Anyone got any new pic they want to share? I was out late the other night and got some cool night ones im proud of that i will upload later.

Boorah
10-03-2011, 05:58 PM
I love taking pictures. Here are a few of my examples:

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5188/5583936347_8bc6986ca6_b.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5285/5256856864_596630a889_b.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5086/5256821150_05979f5118_b.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4097/4793384437_910bb96b2b_b.jpg

My old car, I shot this one using a tripod and a remote.
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1285/4689239000_a1385f0b4e_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3353/4575840344_a6c76ca2a6_b.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4018/4575601624_c078bcde0f_b.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4027/4502717857_4213a179f8_b.jpg

My old SRT.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2748/4420434186_733cd6490d_b.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4063/4400240436_367cd0a8c8_b.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4007/4417156986_1aba80acd3_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2678/4381439134_51c052c993_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2690/4329201246_3c00b31d5b_b.jpg


Sorry, that's quite a few pictures. But pretending to be a photographer is fun.

TunedAlready02
10-03-2011, 06:40 PM
Holy thread revival. I used to suck!!!

ps- you should post more in the photo section over on KCSR

Boorah
10-03-2011, 08:03 PM
Ha, I didn't even realize how old of a thread got bumped. I am working on getting some new equipment, once I do and I start going photo crazy again, I'll post on the photo section on KCSR a lot more.

TunedAlready02
10-03-2011, 09:08 PM
Oh 10-4. What are you getting?

Im WRX over there btw.

Blue Meanie
10-03-2011, 09:14 PM
Boorah; dude, great stuff!!! If you ever wanna shoot my Blue lemme know, I'd be honored!

Boorah
10-03-2011, 09:36 PM
Oh 10-4. What are you getting?

Im WRX over there btw.

Oh nice, you've definitely gotten much better! I sold my D3000 in hopes of getting a D7000 so I can have an internal focusing motor for a 1.4 50mm. Still saving for that sadly. I currently have a T3i that my boss bought me to use at work that I can use for personal needs, but I still would rather have a d7000 lol


Boorah; dude, great stuff!!! If you ever wanna shoot my Blue lemme know, I'd be honored!

Thank you! I was actually thinking we could try to get a couple small groups together to do a couple shoots next season.

whatstaiters
10-04-2011, 07:58 AM
Some old shots on film:

http://i.imgur.com/KtUhy.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/nWDCf.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/9saIe.jpg

From Hawaii last year:

http://i.imgur.com/yWMpY.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/nXIkD.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/kvpre.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/WIMBT.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/QtBBz.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/4Z8GA.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/sVfVz.jpg

pnasmith
10-07-2011, 01:28 AM
1229

Pete